Choral Holidays - Singing in wonderful locations

Posted under: "General Blog Post"

Mar 9, 04:31 PM

The Assurance of booking a Choral Holiday

There are a quite a few companies offering singing holidays now and, for the customer, it’s important that you know what you are going to get. What is is about Choral Holidays which makes us certain that you will have a great time?

Well firstly, you know, from our brochures and our terms and conditions, that there are no hidden extras. Not all singing holiday operators will offer you an all inclusive deal. With us, everything you need is included. There is no necessity for you to spend a penny (or cent) above the price of your holiday if you don’t want to.

Of course, if you feel you want to buy drinks or snacks outside meal times, that’s up to you, but we aim to make sure that there is plenty of all the things that are necessary.

But what about the singing. We promise to run these holidays with integrity and if we don’t have enough people to make it a good event and to form a choir, then the holiday will be cancelled with full return of deposits. I love the music and have absolutely no intention of turning up at a Choral Holiday with a group of people who were expecting to sing choral music but who don’t have the numbers to do it. They would feel cheated and rightly so. Cancellation is disappointing but it’s also necessary if you can’t do the job properly for people who have paid you to do it.

Choral Holidays exists to help people to enjoy making choral music in a choir in beautiful places. Personally, I would be wary of any company who doesn’t state that objective clearly.

It is in our interests to make sure that you have a wonderful time, getting the holiday you expected and more. We will never run a holiday on which we don’t feel this is possible.

Also, musically speaking, there are some people who are more advanced than others. This will always be the case in any choir. To the more experienced I would say, you can still learn because the scope for developing oneself as a true, honest, open and compelling artist is limitless.

On a choral holiday you will find yourself trying our new ways of connecting with the music, with the source of the music, with the space around you and with this building in which you sing. Singing in the great Church in Santa Croce, for example is a great deal different to singing whilst feeling that Santa Croce is merely an extension of you and your resonating space. Does that sound a bit wacky? It’s not really. We are much bigger than the bodies we inhabit and there doesn’t need to be a limit to how much of the space around us we use to resonate.

Also, if you stop observing the dynamics written on a page and start by trying to understand what the composer was trying to say, you start to inhabit the piece and express something much deeper. The music becomes you and you it’s source. The dynamics then happen for an emotional reason and not because someone printed them. Try it. My experience is that the most accomplished amateur musicians are usually the ones who need this sort of thing most.

And to the less experienced I would say, come. The way I work means that you will be guided in learning the music in such a way that you will forget that you ever thought this could be difficult. Cant’t read music? No problem. If you can follow the words and hear the music, and if you can identify that the notes are written at higher or lower pitches on the stave, that’s all you need. Anything more than that is just a question of degree.

And what if you think you have a terrible voice. All I can say to you is that some of the singers in my church choir, individually, make a dreadful noise. Put them all together though and they make a tremendous sound, good enough for York Minster and Wells Cathedral to invite them, after audition, to come as a resident choir to replace their own choirs. Each individual sound makes a contribution to the character of the overall sound

There are no limits and all things are possible. Come and see for yourself.

 

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